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Posts Tagged ‘calf’

Rain and damp continue to keep us out of the last seventy-five acres of corn. Nearly forty trucks have come and gone, the fields studded with fractured and moldy stalks to show what grew before.

post harvest

 

The signs were right for weaning recently so we separated the most stressed mamas from their calves, across a fence from each other. This “fence line weaning” reduces stress on both mama and calf. I came home late to hear a great deal of complaining from those fields the day they were separated, but by the next evening all was nearly quiet. We’ve moved herds around and weaned another group while waiting for the corn to dry out again.

newly weaned calf

 

With drought damaging the grass over the summer, we started using hay a good bit earlier this year. The Bermuda patch is all baled up and ready for the shed.

bermuda bales

A cold front came through yesterday, making it finally feel like October. We loaded another truck this morning and hope to finish picking here soon, so the harvesters can go start picking on the family farm down the road. Then it’s fence repairs, picking beans, and waiting for calving to begin in a few months…

 

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It’s funny how twists and turns seem to cluster together. After the twins (who seem to be doing fine, Brad has seen them both nursing, sometimes together) we had an abandoned calf who is now being bottle-fed and, the same day, a mama with retained placenta. The abandoned calf may have been a twin that belonged to the mama with the placenta problem but we can’t be sure. Twins can be a physical cause for the retention of membranes but there are other reasons it could have happened. I was very concerned for this mama, as uterine infection can be extremely dangerous and with a cow’s anatomy it seems almost unavoidable, but after a couple of days she had shed all that she had been trailing and was showing no signs of illness. On we go to the next challenge.

The kids and I, along with a few other homeschoolers, visited a fellow homeschooling family with bees this week as part of our monthly “patch club.” The kids were much more interested in playing with their friends than learning about bees at first but couldn’t resist paying attention when the beekeeper (also a homeschooling dad) opened one of the hives and brought out the queen. We have kept bees before but we haven’t set up any hives at this farm, and we definitely are pitiful amateurs. I had hoped to include apiary mastery in my projects this year but with a slight nod to sensibility I have let that project go until another year. Attempting to grow absolutely all of our own food that can be grown in this climate is a hefty enough undertaking for one year, in addition to all our regular farming chores. And then there will be the chickens, and I haven’t given up on the turkeys yet…

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