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Archive for June, 2012

Now it is summer!

Dinner on the longest day, all from right outside the door except the tomatoes (from a fellow farmer, ours aren’t quite ready yet) and the dressing ingredients:

summer solstice salad

Cherokee red and romaine lettuces, borage and nasturtium blossoms, and a bit of yellow tomato made this hands-down the most colorful salad I have ever eaten. I mixed up a simple honey yogurt dressing to balance the spicy nasturtiums and the slight bitterness of the lettuce. Vibrant!

We are in a hot-and-dry spell here, making hay and waiting for rain.

walking east toward the hay barn

stacking up for winter

Different patches of corn indicate planting dates by size. The popcorn patch went in last:

popcorn patch in front of the house

The sweet corn in the veggie patch is a bit older:

bicolor sweet corn in the veggie patch

The field corn, planted first, stretches skyward from the veggie patch to the Coosawattee River, obstructing the long views afforded by soybeans in the same fields last year. I wondered whether it may be literally as high as an elephant’s eye, but had no elephants on hand to test that hypothesis.

field corn, this much of it over my head, about two feet

hot, dry sky

around five months old

Corn isn’t the only thing growing in these fields– the calves are getting big, and most of the mamas are bred again. We have been waiting anxiously for the veggie patch to dry out before losing more tomato and pepper plants; now we wait for rain and enjoy the longest day.

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I have made my peace with many invasive species. Kudzu, for instance, bears lovely grape-smelling flowers that can be used to make jelly, its roots ground into flour, its vines woven into baskets, and the sculptures it makes of the lowly yellow pines reminded me as a child of Big Bird’s friend, Snuffleupagus. This invader, however, I do not forgive:

Japanese beetles devouring borage

Japanese beetles emerge in droves in June, seemingly out of nothing, showing preference for the prettiest garden dwellers and turning their leaves to lace. Their shiny colorful shells mock me: I have no need to hide! I am not native! You have no natural predators for me here! Bwa-haha! I grumble and curse at the sight of them and go get a small bucket of water to drown them in before I begin watering the raised beds. I put my gloves on so I won’t feel their prickly, grabby legs as I pluck them off the borage and my lime hydrangea. Yes, I know the borage is delicious, and you may not have it, now die, you wretched pests. I suppose gardening would be incomplete without some casualties…

prisoners of war

In better news, my days-long weeding efforts paid off, and now those raised beds have become the easily maintained wonders I had hoped they would be.

various tomatoes and an eggplant

The Cherokee red lettuce did recover and is thriving. It is reported to be heat tolerant and so far is proving itself worthy indeed of this north Georgia climate.

Cherokee red lettuce between gourds and nasturtiums

The nasturtiums are now blooming, bright yellows and oranges and reds beneath their lilypad-like leaves.

“jewel mix” nasturtiums

The borage is thriving despite the beetle invasion:

borage

And….

blueberries!

At last the blueberries are ripening. Hooray for June!

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